Australia news live: Bandt says Albanese ‘should show up’ to UN climate summit and avoid making Morrison’s mistakes

PM should attend UN climate summit: Adam Bandt

Following reports Anthony Albanese may not attend the next UN climate summit in Cairo in November (still to be decided, but there is a bit on with parliament and whatnot), the Greens leader, Adam Bandt, said the prime minister needs to go so he doesn’t repeat his predecessor’s mistakes:

As opposition leader, Anthony Albanese slammed Scott Morrison’s refusal to show up to the climate summit. The prime minister must not repeat Scott Morrison’s mistakes, but should show up to the summit and join other world leaders acting on coal and gas.

Anthony Albanese said Australia is ‘rejoining’ the world on climate action, but despite passing a climate law with a low emissions reduction target, his government has backed more coal and gas and opened up huge swathes of ocean for oil and gas drilling.

As Pacific Leaders have said, to be taken seriously on climate Australia needs to get serious about coal and gas, which means the prime minister turning up to the climate summit with a commitment to join the Global Methane Pledge and the Powering Past Coal Alliance.

If Australia wants to host a climate summit in the future, the prime minister needs to turn up to this one with a pledge to stop opening up more coal and gas mines.

Updated at 23.57 EDT

Key events

Mostafa Rachwani

Mostafa Rachwani

Good afternoon, Mostafa Rachwani with you this afternoon, taking over from the always brilliant Amy Remeikis.

Updated at 00.17 EDT

Amy Remeikis

Amy Remeikis

Mostafa Rachwani will guide you through the afternoon. Thank you so much for joining me today – take care of you.

Updated at 00.16 EDT

Government responds to labour force figures

The employment minister, Tony Burke, has responded to today’s labour force figures – he wants to see stronger wage growth:

A slight uptick in the overall unemployment rate is due to a welcome increase in the participation rate. Unemployment remains at an historically low level.

The overall result in South Australia (3.9%) and Queensland (3.2%) are particularly encouraging, with both recording their lowest unemployment rates since records began in 1978.

But these economic circumstances should be resulting in stronger wages growth.

These results once again demonstrate why we need to update the workplace system and close the loopholes that are undermining wages growth.

Updated at 00.17 EDT

Parliament launches inquiry into online gambling

Australia has a well documented problem with gambling – but did you know it is now effecting kids as well?

The parliament’s standing committee on social policy and legal affairs has launched an inquiry into online gambling and will look at a range of issues relating to online gambling, including consumer protections support services, regulatory regimes, emerging technologies and advertising restrictions, to report back in May next year.

The independent Curtin MP, Kate Chaney, who is a member of the standing committee, said she was particularly concerned over what she was hearing about gambling and children:

I have heard heart-breaking stories of loss and shame from my electorate. An immediate priority should be reducing children’s access to online gambling advertising. A gambling ad is shown every two minutes on free-to-air TV in Australia. We are conditioning our kids to think gambling is normal.

Chaney said three quarters of Australian kids aged 8–16 years who watch sport think betting on sport is normal and can also name one or more sports betting companies (25% can name four or more).

The very real and insidious nature of this issue was brought to my attention by a number of constituents who relayed their stories. Rod told me of his son Ollie, who had lost $25,000. Sandra told me of her son, who started with a rite-of-passage trip to the races for his 18th birthday and ended up borrowing tens of thousands of dollars from friends and family and losing it through online gambling.

You can find more details of the committee, here (including on how to make a submission).

Updated at 00.15 EDT

PM should attend UN climate summit: Adam Bandt

Following reports Anthony Albanese may not attend the next UN climate summit in Cairo in November (still to be decided, but there is a bit on with parliament and whatnot), the Greens leader, Adam Bandt, said the prime minister needs to go so he doesn’t repeat his predecessor’s mistakes:

As opposition leader, Anthony Albanese slammed Scott Morrison’s refusal to show up to the climate summit. The prime minister must not repeat Scott Morrison’s mistakes, but should show up to the summit and join other world leaders acting on coal and gas.

Anthony Albanese said Australia is ‘rejoining’ the world on climate action, but despite passing a climate law with a low emissions reduction target, his government has backed more coal and gas and opened up huge swathes of ocean for oil and gas drilling.

As Pacific Leaders have said, to be taken seriously on climate Australia needs to get serious about coal and gas, which means the prime minister turning up to the climate summit with a commitment to join the Global Methane Pledge and the Powering Past Coal Alliance.

If Australia wants to host a climate summit in the future, the prime minister needs to turn up to this one with a pledge to stop opening up more coal and gas mines.

Updated at 23.57 EDT

Melissa Davey

Melissa Davey

World Health Organisation hits back at criticism from Lancet Comission on global Covid response

A newly published Lancet Commission report has found widespread, “massive” global failures in the Covid-19 response, which the commission said led to millions of preventable deaths and reversed progress made towards the UN Sustainable Development Goals in many countries.

The commission is the result of two years of work from 28 of the world’s leading experts in public policy, international governance, epidemiology, vaccinology, economics, international finance, sustainability, and mental health, and included consultations with over 100 other contributors to 11 global task forces.

“We must face hard truths – too many governments have failed to adhere to basic norms of institutional rationality and transparency; too many people have protested basic public health precautions, often influenced by misinformation; and too many nations have failed to promote global collaboration to control the pandemic,” the commission’s chair, Prof Jeffrey Sachs, said.

The commission also took aim at the World Health Organisation [WHO], saying there were multiple failures of global cooperation and costly delays by the WHO to declare a “public health emergency of international concern” and to recognise the airborne transmission of the virus.

This coincided with national governments’ failure to cooperate and coordinate on travel protocols, testing strategies, commodity supply chains, data reporting systems, and other vital international policies to suppress the pandemic, the commission said.

The lack of cooperation among governments for the financing and distribution of key health commodities – including vaccines, personal protective equipment, and resources for vaccine development and production in low-income countries – has come at dire costs, the report found.

In a statement just issued, WHO hit back at the claims, saying “there are several key omissions and misinterpretations in the report”.

“The commission does not convey the full arc of WHO’s immediate, multi-year, life-saving response,” the statement said.

Updated at 23.46 EDT

Save the Children bringing week of Indigenous-focused story events to Canberra

Save the Children is bringing its “Our Yarning” program to Canberra from 19-21 September:

Our Yarning is a free, digital library of culturally relevant books created by and for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The Our Yarning team will host three story time sessions at early childhood centres, host writers’ workshops, and hold a public lecture at Canberra University presented by Our Yarning’s Cultural Advisor Dr Julie Owen during the week of events.

You can find all the information here:

Updated at 23.32 EDT

For those who missed Peter Dutton’s earlier interview, Paul Karp has written it up:

Josh Butler wrote about this here:

People who look like me have been told to go back to where they come from at one point or another. I’ve copped it more times than I can count, but the hurt & sorrow it causes never lessens.

When Parliament sits on the 26th Sept, the Greens will move to censure Pauline Hanson. pic.twitter.com/PkLBo6HDSV

— Mehreen Faruqi (@MehreenFaruqi) September 15, 2022

Peter Hannam

Peter Hannam

Jobs data pointing to further interest rate rises to come

Investors have taken the August jobs data to suggest the economy continues to motor along, with the ASX200 share index recently up more than 0.6% on the day (or roughly double the gain before the numbers landed).

The Aussie dollar, too, has advanced against the US, implying some modest increase in the expectations of future RBA rate rises than what investors had plugged in prior to the data release.

Australian dollar ticks a bit higher on the jobs data. Most of the measures point to underlying tightness of the jobs market (even if traction for higher wages is slow to take hold). (Source: Bloomberg) pic.twitter.com/7UgQrmJK6g

— Peter Hannam (@p_hannam) September 15, 2022

Labour market data can be a bit noisy, in part because of the multiple moving parts, such as hours worked. Those rose 0.8% last month to 1.854bn, fully reversing the drop in July.

“The August rise in employment and hours occurred after the winter school holidays and flooding events in NSW, where we saw more people than usual working fewer hours in July,” said Lauren Ford, head of labour statistics at the ABS.

Still, “the number of people working reduced hours due to sickness remained elevated in August, at around 760,000 people,” or about double the number at the end of a typical winter, she said.

So, while the headline jobless rate is up for the first time since it clocked higher last October, the point the markets are making is that the chances of higher interest rates have, on the margin, increased after today’s jobs data.

Brendan Rynne, KPMG’s chief economist, says “the continued strength in the labour market suggests the RBA will maintain its tightening bias to the cash rate in next month’s meeting”.

“The question remains whether the RBA will start to ease off on the size of the rate jumps and revert back to 25 basis point or whether it will continue with double jumps of 50bp, in line with the aggressive approach of the US Federal Reserve.”

The gap in data isn’t really helping forecasters.

We won’t see the September quarter consumer price inflation figures until 26 October – or well after the next RBA board meeting on 4 October – and the wage price index for that quarter doesn’t land until 16 November.

Ample time, then, for speculation.

Updated at 22.57 EDT

ABC’s Barbara Miller meets man who spent seven years planning Queen’s lying in state during street interviews

If you didn’t see this bit of the ABC coverage this morning, I recommend having a watch – particularly if you’re a journalism student.

ABC reporter Barbara Miller was cherry picking people out of “The Queue” (the line to see the Queen lying in state, which is about two miles long at the moment, with the capacity to reach five miles long) for vox pops (short street interviews).

The gentleman she had a chat to turned out to be General David Leakey, a former Black Rod of the UK parliament, who spent seven years planning the lying in state and was queuing up to see how his plan turned out, as well as pay his respects to the Queen, who he had dealings with quite often.

Miller found out at the same time as us that she was interviewing someone a little more knowledgeable than the usual vox pop, but she held it together.

You can watch the interview here.

Updated at 22.51 EDT

Parents and their villages are doing this all over the nation today (and every day).

Privatising early childhood education has had a huge effect not just on families, but the economy at large.

Imogen Dewey

Imogen Dewey

French media on Aukus: Australia still has ‘no precise horizon’ for acquiring submarines

You may have seen that it’s a year since the Aukus pact was announced – a sudden U-turn on Australia’s submarines deal with France that later led the French president, Emmanuel Macron, to accuse the then prime minister Scott Morrison of lying to him.

Now, as Tory Shepherd writes, “the geostrategic environment is even more dire”.

French media have certainly noted the escalation in tensions. A piece in Le Monde this week called the surprise announcement a “slow-burn fuse” that set off a “domino effect” in the Indo-Pacific – and labelled it the “turning point in the polarisation of tensions between China and the United States”.

Un an après, l’alliance « Aukus » entre 🇦🇺,🇬🇧et 🇺🇸 apparaît de + en + comme un détonateur à mèche lente. Après de longs mois de flous, un certain nombre de décisions diplomatiques et militaires structurantes émergent dans son sillage. Bilan ⤵️ #sousmarins https://t.co/4O36x7WH5h

— Elise Vincent (@elise_vincent) September 14, 2022

With more than a hint of schadenfreude, or hauteur if you will, the paper noted that Australia still has “no precise horizon” for acquiring the submarines it abandoned with the French deal – and that, per experts, Aukus has set us back ten years.

Updated at 22.44 EDT

Kiwis announce extended squad in lead-up to Rugby League World Cup

For those watching the rugby league world cup, AAP has an update for you:

Shaun Johnson has earned a recall to the Kiwis setup as part of an extended squad announced by head coach, Michael Maguire, ahead of the Rugby League World Cup.

Experienced playmaker Johnson was overlooked for the Pacific Test win over Tonga earlier this year due to indifferent form with the Warriors, with Maguire backing a new-look halves pairing of Jahrome Hughes and Dylan Brown.

The 32-cap international was part of a 34-man group announced by Maguire on Thursday, with the squad to be reduced prior to this year’s World Cup in England.

Canberra’s Brisbane-born centre Seb Kris, who qualifies through his mother, is a surprise call-up.

He joins fellow uncapped Raiders centre Matt Timoko, as part of a six-man strong Canberra contingent headlined by in-form prop Joe Tapine, Corey Harawira-Naera, Charnze Nicoll-Klokstad and Jordan Rapana.

Canterbury hooker Jeremy Marshall-King is in line for a maiden Test cap, while experienced internationals Jared Waerea-Hargreaves, Braden Hamlin-Uele and Kodi Nikorima also return to the set-up.

Centre Joey Manu is included after missing the Sydney Roosters’ finals loss to South Sydney with a calf injury.

“We’re excited about the depth of players available and the form they’re in,” Maguire said.

“The vast majority of them are in sides that made it into the finals which is a real positive as we look ahead to the tournament.”

The Kiwis will play the Leeds Rhinos in a warm-up game at Headingley on October 8, when retiring former New Zealand captain Tommy Leuluai will play his final professional game.

New Zealand open their World Cup campaign in group games against Lebanon, Jamaica and Ireland.

Updated at 22.25 EDT

Adeshola Ore

Adeshola Ore

Daniel Andrews pledges to establish practitioner paramedic roles

The Victorian premier, Daniel Andrews, has vowed to establish paramedic practitioner roles in the state’s ambulance service to ease pressure on the burdened health system in a pre-election health pledge.

In an Australian first, the paramedic practitioner role would be established within Ambulance Victoria to expedite people’s access to medical care.

Andrews said the announcement was a “significant step forward”.

This is what the workforce has asked for … they want to take their higher level of skills, their commitment, their passion, and go into new spaces and do different things.

Practitioner paramedics have additional primary care skills and can treat a wide range of general health conditions.

The premier made the election commitment on Thursday morning at Wonthaggi Hospital in Victoria’s south-east. Andrews also pledged that if his government was re-elected in November it would fund up to $290m to complete the second stage of the hospital. The expansion would be completed by 2027 and consist of two extra wards.

Updated at 22.06 EDT

Peter Hannam

Peter Hannam

Labour market remains tight even as more people look for work

On the face of it, the August jobs figures are on the strong side because of the jump in full-time positions of almost 60,000 during the month.

And in context, a 3.5% overall jobless rate reading suggests the labour market remains very tight.

And that 66.6% participation rate, up 0.2 percentage points on July, remains close to the record high reached in June of 66.8%.

It’s also 0.7 percentage points higher than before the pandemic began nearly 30 months ago – meaning there’s less slack in the economy.

Among the states and territories, the ACT had the lowest jobless rate at 2.7%, ahead of WA’s 3.1%. NSW at about a third of the economy had an unemployment rate of 3.4% while Victoria (which goes to the polls in just over 10 weeks) was sitting at 3.7%.

We’ll have more reaction shortly here and in our accompanying article:

Updated at 22.04 EDT

A guard has fainted during the Queen’s lying in state:

Updated at 21.57 EDT